Posted by flotz on Monday, November 19, 2012 | Tab

(Capo on the first fret if you want to play along with the recording)

Am        C    D
I was on my way back from a long long dig,
Am        C    D
My pockets were packed full of diamond goods,
Am        C    D
I couldn't wait to get back to my home,
Am        C    D
and show my wife the stuff that I had found,
Am    Em    F        Am    Em    F    G
but soon, I was shocked, to see my house had gone.

[:Chorus:]
Am        C    D
It's a creeper,
hes staring at me,
and hissing with gleee
Am        C    D
cause hes a creeper
He messed up my house
and blew up my spouse
Am        C    D
cause hes a creeper
whats the point of his life
he never had a wife
Am        C    D
cause hes a creeper
but thats just hes thing
hes a griefing king
Am        C    D
I hate creepers X3

Am        C    D
So I began to rebuild my sweet home,
Am        C    D
Collected all the stone and wood I need
Am        C    D
Moved on back toward the building site
Am        C    D
but got stopped by the sight of green,

Am    Em    F        Am    Em    F    G
Struck by deja vu, to see the rest had gone.

Am        C    D
It's a creeper,
hes staring at me,
and hissing with gleee
Am        C    D
cause hes a creeper
He messed up my house
and blew up my spouse
Am        C    D
cause hes a creeper
whats the point of his life
he never had a wife
Am        C    D
cause hes a creeper
but thats just hes thing
hes a griefing king
Am        C    D
I hate creepers X3

Am    Em    F        Am    Em    F    G
... Creepers you're all going to die, now that I've crafted this bow.
DIE DIE DIE DIE DIE DIE DIE DIE DIE.

Am        C    D
It's a creeper,
hes staring at me,
and hissing with gleee
Am        C    D
cause hes a creeper
He messed up my house
and blew up my spouse
Am        C    D
cause hes a creeper
whats the point of his life
he never had a wife
Am        C    D
cause hes a creeper
but thats just hes thing
hes a griefing king
Am        C    D
I hate creepers X3

Posted by flotz on Friday, November 16, 2012 | Live Review

Had not been to the racer in awhile.  Good to see it full of folks. Walked in and the bar was filled, not a seat to be had, people watching old episodes of The Twilight Zone, laughing. Got the East Coaster as always. Caught the first half of Ecstasy in Numbers. Killer jazz fusion. Guitar player tearin it up on a strat, drummer right there pushin it forward and bassist on a five string. Way tight. Complex pieces and they were dialed. Cool band. Hope they play out some more.

Posted by flotz on Sunday, October 14, 2012 | Live Review

October = Earshot Jazz Festival = mind altering jazz in unlikely venues.  From NYC, two trios who lived up to their reputations at SAM. First Trio X (reedman Joe McPhee, bassist Dominic Duval and percussionist Jay Rosen), McPhee tearing it up on the horns, hollering, even a bit of singing. And making some otherworldly sounds come out of his instrument. Duval doing wacky stuff like jamming a drum stick through the strings and less wacky things (but still unusual) like using his bass as a conga drum, and in the end bleeding all over his bass. It was a tribute to Ornette Colman.  Players locked in.

Second trio was Matthew Shipp Trio (Matthew Shipp, Seattle bass player Michael Bisio, and drummer Whit Dickey). They didn't stop between songs but played one continuous flow, ending with this punishingly and jarring head -- can I have another sir? -- Shipp's polemic.   Shipp's tone and style mesmerizing and Dickey completely befuddling as a drummer. All the cliches of avant garde jazz apply: pushing boundaries, eschewing convention, head nods to the past while blazing the future. (Pretty good review here waxing poetic on Matthew Shipp.) While some of the preciousness that surrounds these players can get tiresome (note to festival organizers: just introduce the band without all the hyperbole and aggrandizement), they truly are monster musicians that challenge, entertain, bedazzle, and demand you rethink how you listen to music and what music can be. It ain't always four on the floor. Thank god.

Posted by flotz on Thursday, October 11, 2012 | Album Review

Kinda late to the party on this one, but its never too late to review a good record right? Some may be put off by the vocal treatment, but once you lock into his timbre and elocution, there’s a lot going on with these songs, both structurally and lyrically.  Repeated listens reveal clever chord structures, word play and melodic inventiveness. And there’s thoughtful instrumentation and production, with banjos, horns and strings, used tastefully.

Overall, it’s a break up record, but one more of redemption than bile.  According to Eric Anderson (the brains behind Cataldo),  “I have such happy memories of making this record about such an unpleasant time…I think that disparity, the peculiar warmth of this album’s melancholia, is what makes me proudest now. I hope that feeling isn’t something I’ve imagined. I hope it’s an ornament that seems intrinsic and essential. Like an engraving worn with the characteristic patina of something truly old.”

Finally figured out what the song “Prison Boxing” itself is about: rediscovery of friends after a break-up, people you took for granted whom you now have time to hang out with.  “My friends say, ‘How are you? It has been too many years’ And I say, ‘With purity and candor I’ve missed you.’” Don’t know if a break-up song has expressed a sentiment quite like this.

Have to admit, not a big a fan of the really raw tracks (tracks #1, #6-#8). But the rest really holds up.

Check it out below:

Posted by flotz on Tuesday, July 3, 2012 | Live Review

flyersingersongwriterThe Triple Door now doing singer-songwriter showcases in the Musicquarium lounge on Tuesday nights. Other than the giant pillar that sits right in front of the stage, it’s a great space for intimate singer songwriter stuff. Dig the giant aquarium.  Glad to see the Triple Door supporting the singer songwriter scene, giving folks a venue to play.

On this past Tuesday, first up was Beth Whitney accompanied by a standup bass player who added texture to her tunes, a Jaco Pastorius/Joni Mitchell vibe. She had some nice tunes, a sweet voice and a spry presence. Did a Dylan cover of “Make You Feel My Love.” Always thought that was a weird line.  Not sure it works.

Next was Susy Sundborg on the keys. Refreshing to hear the piano, so much more complex than folk guitar which tends to be limited to strumming major/minor triads whereas the piano lends itself to modulations, sharps/flats, inversions and generally more chordal nuance. She’s a facile piano player. Played one tune without vocals that was damned pretty.  Did a cover of a Christian rock anthem from the 90s ballad style.

Last up was Kate Lynne Logan, who was joined by a guy playing bass ukulele, straight up country style. He added some nice harmony too. She’s got an alt country thing going on with a real breathy voice.  Would be cool to hear them with a drummer.

You see some pics from the show by George Bentley here:  http://www.flickr.com/photos/gwillie/sets/72157630415665454/with/7499801120/.